Crime Library: Criminal Minds and Methods

Valerie Plame

Administration Tactics

Karl Rove
Karl Rove
Newsweek's Michael Isikoff reported on July 10, nearly two years after Wilson's New York Times Op-Ed, that Karl Rove was Cooper's source, and unsurprisingly, Rove didn't have kind words about Wilson.

This bit of information sent a ripple through the press; this time it was more favorable toward Wilson. The headlines were sensational:

"A CIA Cover Blown, A White House Exposed."

"Ex-Diplomat's Surprise Volley on Iraq Drove White House into Political Warfare Mode."

"What Karl Rove told Time Magazine's Reporter."

"Top Aides Reportedly Set Sights on Wilson: Rove and Cheney Chief of State were intent on discrediting CIA agent's husband, prosecutor's told."

On October 28 Fitzgerald held a news conference: Libby was being indicted on numerous charges, including, obstruction of justice, perjury, and making false statements concerning his conversations with reporters about Plame and Wilson. Almost immediately upon his indictment, Libby resigned.

In March 2007, Libby was convicted of obstruction of justice, making false statements and two counts of perjury for misrepresenting the substance of his conversations with reporters about Plame's relationship with Wilson and the CIA. Though he was not charged with revealing Plame's identity, he was fined $250,000 and sentenced to 30 months in prisonand two years of probation. The prison component of the sentence was commuted in July 2007 by President Bush as "excessive."

The source of the leak revealing Plame's identity to Novak was ultimately revealed in 2006 to have been Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage, not Libby or Rove, but Armitage was not charged with any crime since he did not have knowledge of Plame's undercover status, or the classified nature of her employment, absent which his revelations did not constitute a crime under current law.

Dissatisfied with the outcome, Plame and her husband unsuccessfully sued Rove, Libby, Cheney, and other White House officials for civil damages related to the Plame's media exposure. The case was dismissed and the Wilsons are considering whether to appeal.

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