Crime Library: Criminal Minds and Methods

The BTK Story

Nancy Fox and Marine Hedge Case Evidence

By Rachael Bell

Rader stalked Nancy Fox, 25, for months before he murdered her, it was revealed in court on August 17th. According to testimony by Wichita Police Detective Tim Relph, Rader told him that Fox sexually appealed to him and that he had an "attachment with her," especially since she, "dressed nice" and was a "nice family girl," Buselt stated in The Wichita Eagle. Rader even went so far as to tell detectives that she was "one of the more- -more enjoyable kills," it was further reported. 

Fox's murder was one of the few Rader committed where he experienced no interruptions and where he was able to exercise complete control over his victim. Rader called it a "perfect hit," Relph said during testimony. Like his other victims, Rader strangled and tortured Fox in the hopes that he would make her his bondage slave in his heavily fantasized afterlife.

Later during the court proceedings, Sedgwick County sheriff's Sgt. Tom Lee took the stand. He testified about Rader's confessions concerning Marine Hedge's murder. Lee said that Rader found the killing of Hedge to be "his most complicated hit" because he actually moved her body to different locations, consciously changing his MO in an effort to throw off police. Lee suggested that Rader seemed pleased with himself that he was able to get away with her murder and body disposal and avoid detection. However, Rader admitted it was a bad idea that he took such a risk to murder in his "own habitat."

According to Lee, after Rader strangled Hedge he stripped her body, wrapped her in blankets and put her in the trunk of his car. He took the body to the church and carried it into the basement. He had the key to the building because he was a congregation leader. Lee said that Rader had earlier hid plastic in the church so he could act out his bondage fantasy with Hedge that night. Rader posed the body in sexually explicit ways using the plastic and then took pictures, Buslet said. Years later, investigators found pictures in Rader's home, which depicted him wrapped in plastic, similar to how Hedge was posed in the pictures. The photographs supported the prosecution's argument that Rader saw his victims only as objects, which he used for the sole purpose of acting out his sick fantasies.

 

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