Crime Library: Criminal Minds and Methods

The Soham Murders Trial

The Murder Trial

Mr. Justice Moses
Mr. Justice Moses

On November 3, 2003, the trial of Ian Huntley and Maxine Carr began at London's Old Bailey Courthouse. During the first few days, a jury of five men and seven women were selected to overhear the cases. The trial judge, Mr. Justice Moses, presided over the trial that engrossed the country and captured worldwide attention.

The prosecution's case, led by Richard Latham QC, began its opening arguments two days into the trial. Latham suggested that he would present the court with overwhelming evidence that Huntley brutally murdered the girls and tried to cover it up. He also claimed that there was evidence that Carr misled the police to protect Huntley, although it was likely that she was not directly involved in the murders. During his statement, Latham went on to retrace the girls' last moments and Huntley's movements around the time of their deaths. Near the end of the first day the prosecutor had already laid down the foundation of his case. It was hoped that the evidence would speak for itself.

Richard Latham QC, prosecutor
Richard Latham QC, prosecutor

Just as Latham promised, over the subsequent weeks he presented the jury with significant evidence and testimony that pointed to Huntley as the primary culprit in the murders. The jury learned that at the time Jessica's phone switched off, the last signal sent indicated that she was in the "immediate area" of Huntley's house, the BBC reported in their November article. Moreover, they were presented with phone records that proved that Carr was a hundred miles away in Grimsby visiting her mother at the time of the girls' disappearance, whereas Huntley was traced to the location in and around Soham. Thus, there was little if any chance that Carr was present when the girls were abducted and murdered.

Camera shows girls near Huntley home
Camera shows girls near Huntley home

Other significant evidence introduced by the prosecution included fingerprints on the bin liner that were matched with Huntley. Furthermore, according to the 2003 BBC News article, "The Soham Trial: Key Evidence," witnesses testified that they had seen Huntley sanitizing his red Ford Fiesta car, "thoroughly washing and vacuuming it the day after the girls disappeared." He also, "ripped out the lining of the boot and replaced it with domestic carpet and he got rid of a throw (rug) that had been covering the back seat," the article further suggested.

The same day he cleaned his car, Huntley also replaced all four tires, even though the tread was not worn down. A November 6, 2003 BBC News article suggested that Huntley offered the mechanic who performed the work 10 to record a false registration number. Along with the fiber and hair evidence, there were also traces of chalk, concrete, soil and other materials found in and beneath Huntley's car, which were forensically linked to the area where the girls' bodies were found, the BBC stated in their article "The Soham Trial: Key Evidence."

Categories
Advertisement