Crime Library: Criminal Minds and Methods

Donald Blom: A Repeat Sex Offender Finally Stopped

The Sex Offender

 

Blom's problems started early in life. In the tenth grade, he went to a reform school because he was a frequent truant and an underage drinker. In 1975, he kidnapped a fourteen-year-old girl, gagged her and molested her. He locked her in the trunk of his car, but she escaped and turned him in. He went to trial and was convicted. Three years later, he committed aggravated assault, and five years after that was arrested for criminal sexual conduct. He also took two teenage girls to a remote area where he threatened both and sexually assaulted one at knifepoint. They were rescued only because a police officer saw their car parked the wrong way, scaring Blom off. But he was later caught for this one as well. Thus, Blom had five convictions for sex offenses that involved kidnap or sexual assault. For some reason, he had been left free to continue.

Donald Blom
Donald Blom

In 1992, a psychologist conducted an extensive examination, learning from Blom that he'd been abused by his father when he was 13, and had been a heavy drinker ever since. The professional predicted that if Blom were not closely monitored, he would probably engage in additional antisocial behavior. Why he was out of prison after abducting seven different girls was anyone's guess, and the scandal of his lenient treatment by the legal system would go right to the heart of the case. Had the system worked better, Katie would be alive. Instead, Blom had managed to change his name and shake off the taint of his criminal history, getting jobs, getting married and his new identity as a cover to continue to harm.

In the case of Katie Poirier, Blom was charged with kidnapping and the illegal possession of a firearm, a federal charge—given his prior convictions, Blom was not allowed to carry any firearm. He was offered a plea agreement, but he still would not talk. But then in September, he said he wanted to make an admission. He worked out a deal where he would talk after he called members of his family.

His attorney, Rodney Brodin tried to dissuade him from making any deal, since Blom would probably still receive a sentence of life in prison, but Blom insisted he wanted to put the matter behind him. He was told he would receive incarceration in North Dakota, so he would be near family. While three defense attorneys sat in the room, watching as Blom was given several chances to think it through and was fully advised of his rights, Blom went forward. He seemed clear-headed to all witnesses.

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