Crime Library: Criminal Minds and Methods

Dr. Yazeed Essa

A Suspicious Death

Rosemarie Essa
Rosemarie Essa
Instead, for whatever reason, Rosie took the slow way to the movies. She took a long, winding road, with slow speeds. She called Eva McGregor 10 minutes after leaving and told her she felt really strange. McGregor testified in court: "She had taken a calcium pill right before she left theher house. She didn't really want to take it. And she said, as she was in it, you know, rushing out the door, he said, 'Here, take it. Take your calcium.' 'Now, I don't know if that's what's making me sick.'"

McGregor thought it was weird, too, and kept replaying the conversation in her head. Rosie hung up and called her husband, whose phone went straight to voicemail.

And then, as Essa had predicted, his wife crashed. But instead of suffering brutal injuries, her SUV merely grazed another car and wound to a stop. She was in a fender bender, with minor scrapes and bruises. According to Dateline NBC, Tara Tamsen, a medical technician who witnessed the accident rushed over and immediately sensed something was not right.

Rosie began vomiting in the car. She quickly lost consciousness and was rushed to the hospital, where her killer, her husband, was working in the emergency room.

Yazeed Essa was a doctor.

He was supposed to save lives, not take them.

He watched impassively as the ER team struggled to save his wife's life, the life he had imperiled and the life he expected was gone for good. He watched her family sobbing uncontrollably. He exhibited strange behavior for a man who should have been alarmed or grieving. Several people testified that Essa was emotionless; he did not cry, he did not ask questions, and when he sent out an email announcing his wife's death, it was perfunctory. Dominic DiPuccio, Rosie's brother, told Dateline that the email read: "Just wanted to let you know that Rosie died yesterday in a minor car accident. She will be missed.'"

Categories
Advertisement