Crime Library: Criminal Minds and Methods

Perry March

"He's My Son!"

Perry March
Perry March

In his videotaped testimony Arthur March explained that he had helped his son move Janet's body from the construction site where Perry had initially buried her. One of Perry's clients, a real-estate developer, had told him that a road was going to be built 10 yards from Janet's makeshift grave, and he feared that it would be discovered. The father and son put Janet's bones and clothes in a plastic "leaf bag" and drove from Tennessee to Kentucky in Janet's Volvo. They checked into a motel, and Perry stayed in the room while his father looked for a suitable place to dump of the body.

Arthur drove along I-65 to the Bowling Green area until he found a site he liked. He stopped and hid the remains in a brush pile. Nine years later when he tried to locate the spot with the police, he couldn't find it because, he said, the road had been widened and the landscape had changed. To this day, Janet March's body has never been found.

When asked why he helped Perry hide the body, Arthur replied as if the answer were obvious: "He's my son!"

Dr. William Bass
Dr. William Bass

Dr. William Bass, founder of the Body Farm at the University of Tennessee where researchers study the rates of decomposition in human corpses, corroborated Arthur March's testimony regarding the condition of the body he moved. A human body in Tennessee in August heat would skeletonize in three weeks, Dr. Bass testified, which supported Arthur March's testimony that Janet March's remains were mostly bones when he and his son unburied them.

Jurors also learned that Perry March had written a novel called @Murder.com in which an attractive brunette is killed. In the book, March describes the victim "lying on the smooth pile carpet, crumpled and soft-looking. She lay on her back, her left leg tucked beneath her, her head facing the ceiling, hands to her throat, eyes open and bulging. Classic strangulation expression."

The evidence presented was enough to convince the jury that Perry March was not the innocent man he claimed to be, and on August 17, 2006, they found him guilty on all counts. At sentencing, Judge Steve Dozier tallied up March's convictions in his three trials and gave him 56 years of hard time, which he is currently serving.

Judge Dozier also rejected the plea deal that Arthur March had made with the state and sentenced him to five years for his participation in the crimes. Three months later Arthur March died at the Federal Medical Center in Fort Worth, Texas.

Janet March
Janet March

Perry and Janet March's children, Sammy and Tzipora, are now living with their grandparents, Lawrence and Carolyn Levine.

Dominic Dunne's Power, Priviledge and Justice

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