Crime Library: Criminal Minds and Methods

Thrill Kill: The Murder of Kimberly Cates

The Aftermath

 

Jaime Cates
Jaime Cates
"There's no such thing as an innocent stranger anymore," Diane Richardson, a former substitute teacher, told the New Hampshire Union Leader in the aftermath of the crime. That certainly seems to be the case. In a state that prides itself on its independence and freedom, the crimes of the Disciples of Destruction are forcing a reevaluation. On a personal level, the people of Mont Vernon now habitually lock their doors. Many residents have obtained guard dogs. And it seems that few can be interviewed about the trial without mentioning the handgun or ax that they now keep bedside in the event of an intruder. Something about the random, arbitrary nature of the crimes committed by Spader, Gribble, Marks, and Glover have left people thinking that callous murder and random attacks are the new normal.

The crimes have even left an impact on the state'slegal system. Although New Hampshire holds a reputation as the most conservative state in New England, it has not executed a person since 1939. The state currently hosts only one prisoner on death row — a cop killer. Given the current state of New Hampshire law, none of this group, including Spader, would have been eligible for execution. Their ages at the time of the crime prohibited the death penalty. Beyond that, according to The Boston Globe, in New Hampshire, "Under state law, the death penalty can be imposed in the murder of a law enforcement or judicial officer, murders for hire, murder while serving a life sentence, and murders committed during kidnappings, rapes, or drug sales."

David Cates
David Cates
New Hampshire's citizens and lawmakers are considering an overhaul of the eligibility requirements for capitaloffenses.

David and Jaimie Cates are alive. They stay out of the public eye and try to help each other heal. After Gribble's February trial perhaps they will be able to achieve some measure of peace.



Categories
Advertisement