Crime Library: Criminal Minds and Methods

Ken McElroy

Invincible

Ken McElroy
Ken McElroy

McElroy was still married to his second wife, Sharon, even though they hadn't lived together for years. She turned up in McFadin's office the next day, seeking a divorce.

McFadin arranged a quick dissolution. Trena was still just 15, so her mother—already burned out of one house by McElroy—was required to sign an affidavit authorizing the marriage. She did so. The lawyer found an aged judge in a small Missouri town who performed the ceremony on the same day that Trena's mother signed the affidavit. McFadin was the witness.

The lawyer placed a gloating phone call to inform the prosecutor that his only witness against McElroy was now the man's wife—and therefore could not be compelled to testify against him. Technically, the prosecution could have gone forward, but it was a hopeless case. Eventually, all charges were dropped.

McElroy, Trena and Alice resumed their life together. They often traveled in a three-pickup convoy, each watching the other's back. McElroy must have felt invincible.

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