Crime Library: Criminal Minds and Methods

Murder on the Moors

David Smith had witnessed a murder. He told police how his sister in law, Myra Hindley, had invited him in the night before to watch while her boyfriend, Ian Brady, was openly murdering a man in the living room. After the murder the couple laughed about the look on the victim’s face, and chit-chatted over tea with Smith about other murders they had committed.

The Snowtown Murders

November 2000 saw the beginning of the trial for the largest serial killing case in Australian history. The victims, who were found dismembered in barrels of acid, were being killed for their “crimes,” alleged pedophiles, drug abusers, homosexuals, or for simple obesity. Evidence showed that they had been extensively tortured with everyday tools such as pincers, pliers and clamps, combined with genital electrocution.

Today in Crime History: A Witness Comes Forward in the Moors Murders

On October 7, 1965, David Smith told police he had witnessed a murder, that sister in law, Myra Hindley, had invited him in for some wine while her boyfriend, Ian Brady, was killing someone with an axe in the living room. Afterwards they laughed about the look on the victim’s face and chatted about the other murders.

Love, Death and the Sunset Strip Killers

Carol Bundy and Doug Clark entered into a bizarre relationship bent on satisfying their warped sexual fantasies of torture, murder and necrophilia, in this highly unusual case of a couple who committed gruesome serial killings together. On August 13, 1980, Carol Bundy was arraigned for the murder of John Murray, and ordered held without bail.

Martha Beck & Raymond Fernandez: The Lonely Hearts Killers

The Lonely Hearts Murders, which seductively entwined voodoo magic, kinky sex and personal ads, became one of the most sensational cases of the 1940s, and the inspiration for several Hollywood movies. Lonely Hearts Killers Martha Beck and Raymond Fernandez were convicted of three murders, but suspected in as many as 20.

Leopold & Loeb

On Wednesday, May 21, 1924, fourteen-year-old Bobby Franks disappeared while walking home from school. His abduction and murder at the hands of two wealthy and intelligent teenagers became one of the talked-about crimes of the 20th century.

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